Giving Back

We at Cielo Solar believe in giving back to our community and do so by donating a percentage of the profit from every solar system we install to a worthy charitable organization.

Because animal rescue & prevention of cruelty to animals is very close to our hearts, we are proud to offer our customers the choice of the following wonderful organizations.  Once your purchase from Cielo is complete, we will make a donation, on your behalf, to the organization you designate.

 

Happy New Chicken Rescue

http://www.chickenrescue.org/

Happy Hen Chicken Rescue was founded by eleven year old Zoe Rosenberg in 2014. Zoe is now thirteen years old and continues  to work hard to end cruelty towards animals.

Hens are stuck in cages suffering as we speak. These hens are called battery hens, they are kept in small cages called battery cages. These hens never get to feel the grass beneath their feet, see the sunshine, take a dust bath or do any of the things chickens live to do. Once these hens are two years old, they are considered 'spent'. When a hen is "spent" it is because they have a drop in egg production. Some egg farms are willing to sell or give these hens to rescues. So instead of buying chicks from the feed store, please adopt some rescued hens from Happy Hen Chicken Rescue or another sanctuary. 

 

 

Wildlife Waystation Mission

www.wildlifewaystation.org

The mission of the Wildlife Waystation is to rescue and provide sanctuary for native and exotic wildlife both nationally and internationally.

Founded by Martine Colette in 1965 and incorporated in 1976, the Wildlife Waystation (WW) is located on 160 acres in the Angeles National Forest in Southern California. 

Internationally recognized, WW has accepted four tigers from Ireland, lions from New Zealand and Canada, other exotic animals from across the United States, as well as native animals in Southern California and other states. 

Every rescue was important and often life saving, whether it was two orphaned grizzly cubs in Montana, twenty four lions and three ligers from a deplorable place in Idaho, chimpanzees from biomedical research, an owl who had been shot or an injured scrub jay. 

Since 1976, WW has helped more than 76,000 abused, abandoned, orphaned, and injured animals. These include Siberian and Bengal tigers, lions, leopards, ligers, jaguars, mountain lions, wolves, coyotes, camels, primates, hyenas, bears, foxes, reptiles, exotic birds, birds of prey, and more. 

With over 40 chimpanzees, WW is the largest chimpanzee sanctuary in the Western United States. Almost all of our chimps came from biomedical research labs in 1995 and 1996. 

WW provides 24-hour care to more than 400 permanent animal residents. The Health Center and full-time veterinary staff ensures that the care each animal receives is based on the individual animal’s requirements. Preventative care, treatment for infections, diseases, including cancer, and geriatric care are all part of providing exceptional care for the animals. 

 

 

Pacific Marine Mammal Center

http://www.pacificmmc.org

The Pacific Marine Mammal Center rescues, rehabilitates and releases marine mammals and inspires ocean stewardship through research, education and collaboration.

Rescue

Unlike whales and dolphins, seals and sea lions don't have to remain in water in order to survive. The animals beach themselves to be warm and dry when feeling ill. They seek rest on land for a variety of reasons and are not always in need of intervention. Our staff is trained to recognize animals suffering from infections, malnourishment, pneumonia, gill net strangulation, etc. which can harm an animal's chance for survival.

Rehabilitation

When a "patient" is  admitted, our staff performs all necessary procedures under the direction and protocols set by the Animal Care Director and our Veterinary Medical Director. During the course of rehabilitation, animals require a variety of treatments such as administration of antibiotics and subcutaneous fluids, tube feeding, force feeding, wound care, etc. 

Most animals come in dehydrated and the most effective means to provide fluids and nourishment is through tube feeding. The process requires blending of fish, electrolytes, warm water, vitamins, and medication into a fish formula. This formula is fed to the animals by inserting a flexible tube into the stomach using large syringes. As soon as the animals are hydrated and stable, we wean them to eat whole fish. 

Release

Once an animal has gained an optimal weight and is competing for food, it's ready for release. Prior to release, each animal is tagged with an identification number. The color-coded tags indicate the animal has been rehabilitated and helps identify the specific animal and care center in case the animal needs care in the future. We strive to return every one of our patients back to the wild once their care with us is complete.

 

Farm Sanctuary 

http://www.farmsanctuary.org/

Our Mission:

To protect farm animals from cruelty, inspire change in the way society views and treats farm animals, and promote compassionate vegan living.

Factory Farming

In an ideal world, there would be no need for Farm Sanctuary as it exists today. There would be no factory farms or stockyards. Cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys, and sheep would be free to roam in their pastures, sleep in the sun, scratch at the earth, and enjoy life. Animals in today’s industrialized farms are treated like commodities. They are crowded into warehouses, confined so tightly that they cannot easily walk or even turn around. They are de-beaked, de-toed, and their tails are docked without anesthetic. Their bones break because their bodies have been manipulated to grow so fast that they can’t support their own weight. Factory farm animals are denied fresh air, sun, wholesome food, room to move, and the freedom to exhibit their natural behaviors. This rampant abuse of millions of animals every day is largely invisible to the public.

Farm Sanctuary

Farm Sanctuary was founded in 1986 to combat the abuses of factory farming and encourage a new awareness and understanding about farm animals. Today, Farm Sanctuary is the nation’s largest and most effective farm animal rescue and protection organization. We have rescued thousands of animals and cared for them at our sanctuaries in Watkins Glen, New York; Northern California (Orland); and the Los Angeles area. At Farm Sanctuary, these animals are our friends, not our food. We educate millions of people about their plight and the effects of factory farming on our health and environment. We advocate for laws and policies to prevent suffering and promote compassion, and we reach out to legislators and businesses to bring about institutional reforms.

Farm Sanctuary is committed to ending cruelty to farm animals and promoting compassionate vegan living through rescue, education, and advocacy efforts. Please join us. A compassionate world begins with you!

 

 

ASPCA

http://www.aspca.org

We Are Their Voice

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® (ASPCA®) was the first humane society to be established in North America and is, today, one of the largest in the world.

Our organization was founded on the belief that animals are entitled to kind and respectful treatment at the hands of humans and must be protected under the law. Headquartered in New York City, the ASPCA maintains a strong local presence, and with programs that extend our anti-cruelty mission across the country, we are recognized as a national animal welfare organization. We are a privately funded 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, and are proud to boast more than 2 million supporters across the country.

The ASPCA’s mission, as stated by founder Henry Bergh in 1866, is “to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States.”

 

The Beagle freedom project

http://www.beaglefreedomproject.org

Beagle Freedom Project began in December 2010 when Shannon Keith received information that beagles who were used for animal experiments in a research lab were to be given a chance at freedom. Our mission is rescuing and finding homes for beagles used in laboratory research.

Beagles are the most popular breed for lab use because of their friendly, docile, trusting, forgiving, people-pleasing personalities. The research industry says they adapt well to living in a cage, and are inexpensive to feed. Research beagles are usually obtained directly from commercial breeders who specifically breed dogs to sell to scientific institutions.

Testing done on beagles in university and other research facilities includes medical/pharmaceutical, household products and cosmetics. When they are no longer wanted for research purposes, some labs attempt to find homes for adoptable, healthy beagles. Working directly with these labs, Beagle Freedom Project is able to remove and transport beagles to place them in loving homes. All rescues are done legally with the cooperation of the facility.

Anyone interested in fostering or adopting a lab beagle should be aware of the challenges these dogs have. They will not be accustomed to life in a home and will not have experience with children, cats, or other dogs. They will not be house-trained and accidents will happen, although they learn quickly. Many have gone directly from a commercial breeder to the lab, and have never felt grass under their feet or even seen the sun. They will have been fed a special diet formulated for lab animals and may be difficult to adjust to new foods. They will be unfamiliar with treats, toys, bedding and may never have walked on a leash. They will have lived in cages with steel wire floors and may have inflamed or infected paws from the pressure. They may be fearful of people initially and may have phobias from a lifetime in confinement or from being restrained. They are likely to have been surgically de-barked by the breeder and have an ID number tattooed in their ear. Please also be aware that although these beagles are considered healthy, you will be given very little information about the beagle’s medical history, and you will not be told its origins or what kind of testing they may have been used for.

With time, patience, play, companionship, love – and most of all, freedom – these dogs will learn how to become dogs, and their transformation will be amazing.

Our hope is that with your help, we can encourage more research labs to release animals and give them a chance at life, instead of destroying adoptable pets.

 

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